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Knee Injury and Surgery Specialists

Knee pain is an extremely common complaint, and there are many causes. It is important to make an accurate diagnosis of the cause of your symptoms so that appropriate treatment can be directed at the cause.

Knee Osteoarthritis: Is Knee Replacement Surgery Inevitable?

Knee osteoarthritis (OA), can make almost anything you do painful: walking, climbing stairs, -- even sitting or lying down. Although knee replacement surgery is one osteoarthritis treatment option that can help bring relief, itís not the only one. There are many choices to try first that can reduce knee pain, improve your ability to move, and possibly delay or eliminate your need for joint replacement surgery altogether.

Keep bones strong

  • Eat a nutritious diet with enough calcium and vitamin D, which helps your body absorb calcium. Calcium is found in dairy products, such as milk, cheese, and yogurt; dark green, leafy vegetables, such as broccoli; and other foods. For more information, see the topic Healthy Eating.
  • Exercise and stay active. It is best to do weight-bearing exercise, such as walking, jogging, stair climbing, dancing, or lifting weights, for 45 to 60 minutes at least 4 days a week. Weight-bearing exercises stimulate new bone growth by working the muscles and bones against gravity. Exercises that are not weight-bearing, such as swimming, are good for your general health but do not stimulate new bone growth. Talk to your doctor about an exercise program that is right for you. Begin slowly, especially if you have been inactive.
When to See a Knee Specialist

For athletes and weekend warriors alike, knee pain can get in the way of enjoying life and should never be ignored. If left untreated, knee pain that starts as a nuisance can turn into serious injury down the road. When should you see a specialist?

Answer any of the following that apply:

1. Has knee pain been keeping you from doing hobbies or tasks you used to enjoy? Yes   No
2. Has a nagging knee injury sidelined you from a sport? Yes    No
3. Does your knee hurt after playing sports, running or lifting a heavy object, but you aren't sure whether the pain is minor muscle strain or something more serious? Yes   No
4. Is your kneeís range of motion not what it used to be? Yes   No
5. Do you begin to develop swelling around the knee after activities? Yes   No
6. Does your knee feel unstable or does it freeze up? Yes   No
7. Have you suffered from knee pain for several days or several weeks and over-the-counter pain reliever is not working? Yes    No
 

Top 5 Tips for Knee Health

  1. Always warm up before doing any kind of physical activity.
  2. Wear shoes that fit properly, especially when running.
  3. Avoid sudden changes in the intensity of activity. During workouts, always increase the force and duration of activity gradually.
  4. Strengthen your hamstring and quadriceps, which are muscles that work together to bend or straighten the leg. Strengthening both muscles through weights can better protect the leg against knee injuries.
  5. Talk to a knee specialist if you encounter any kind of pain that persists for more than several days, or recurs after particular activities.

 

The following tips may prevent knee problems:
  • Wear your seat belt in a motor vehicle.
  • Don't carry objects that are too heavy. Use a step stool. Do not stand on chairs or other unsteady objects.
  • Wear knee guards during sports or recreational activities, such as roller-skating or soccer.
  • Stretch before and after physical exercise, sports, or recreational activities to warm up your muscles.
  • Use the correct techniques or positions during activities so that you do not strain your muscles.
  • Use equipment appropriate to your size, strength, and ability. Avoid repeated movements that can cause injury. In daily routines or hobbies, look at activities in which you make repeated knee movements.
  • Consider taking lessons to learn the proper technique for sports. Have a trainer or person who is familiar with sports equipment check your equipment to see if it is well suited for your level of ability, body size, and body strength.
  • If you feel that certain activities at your workplace are causing pain or soreness from overuse, call your human resources department for information on other ways of doing your job or to talk about using different equipment.

 

 

   

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